Ernst Toller

by Merilyn Moos

A figure who has received far too little attention is Ernst Toller. (The honorable exception is Richard Dove’s ‘’He was a German. A biography of Ernst Toller’, from which I draw.)

Toller, born in 1893, was disabused of any illusions about Germany when witnessing the horrors of World War 1 in the trenches.… read on...

Post-War Denazification and Restitution in Germany

by Irena Fick

It is well documented that Nazis who held high office during the Third Reich were reintegrated and continued to work as judges, in police forces, in the Foreign Office and in the secret service of the Federal Republic of Germany.… read on...

Anti-Nazis who came to the UK

by Merilyn Moos

While it was not the subject of our book, we thought it would be interesting to note what happened to the anti-Nazis mentioned in our book, ‘Anti-Nazi Germans’, who fled Germany and ended up, even if temporarily, in the UK.… read on...

History in the Mirror? – How the Nazis rose to power

Introduction

Although history does not repeat itself, the rise of popular ultra-right nationalist movements across Europe and Johnson’s various attempts to side-line Parliament, to label opponents as close to traitors to the nation (to be read as England), and to present himself as a man (sic) of the people, backed by a baying right-wing press, rings some nasty historical bells.… read on...

Marx Memorial Library talk on Siegi and Germany

Writing about ones father can be problematic but Siege’s life has a significance: it coincided first with the tragic failure of the German revolution of 1918/19 and then the rise to power of the Nazis, events which framed the C20th. I am going to focus here on a group who are generally ignored by both historians and politicians: those who actively opposed the rise and early ascendency of Nazism in Germany and who then fled for their lives to Britain.… read on...

Cardiff talk on the absence of memory

by Merilyn Moos

What is distinctive about the children of refugees from Nazism is the absence of memory. Although the Holocaust is now part of the understanding of the consequences of Nazism, the images and meanings are general. But the British second generation were told almost nothing about what had happened to their own grandparents and wider family.… read on...